“Erotic Imagination”

May 25, 2016

About a year ago. I set up a channel on Vimeo called “Erotic Imagination.” I described it in this way:

The erotic is an entry to the transcendent. While these videos contain both male and female nudity, they use reality, fantasy and art to focus on authentic human relationships in a way that transcends humanity and draws us into a consciousness that is both individual and universal.

Since then, I’ve added 134 videos to the channel. I’ve realized that in doing this I’ve really been asking a question: How can nudity in video and in performance (as many of these are video recordings of live performances) create a “focus on authentic human relationships,” and how can nudity do this “in a way that transcends humanity and draws us into a consciousness that is both individual and universal”?

To the extent that the videos in the collection use nudity to either show us something profound about human relationships or draw us into a change of consciousness, they themselves are an answer to this question – but not an answer that is easily put into words.

Miguel Thomé, a director/editor from Brazil, has created “Inanimado.” The name is Portugese and means inanimate, lifeless or insensitive. Thomé describes the work as, “A surrealist journey through the unconscious of a couple belittled by the metropolis.” As I see the end of this film, I find myself asking: Is the man’s scream one of ecstasy, anger or terror? What would have been the effect of having two men or two women perform the scene? — of alternating opposite and same sex couples? — of using electronic editing to have a man dance with himself?

The Greek videographer, Zafeiris Haitidis, describes his video, “West of Eden” in this way: “Adam bites the apple. He abandons Eve and the Garden of Eden in search of his destiny on earth. What he discovers, though, is his worst nightmare… ‘You can’t escape yourself.'” After seeing this video, my thought is it isn’t that Adam can’t escape himself. He can’t find himself – certainly not after moving from the Garden of Eden into a twenty-first century urban world.

The New York choreographer, John Jasperse, has chosen to use same-sex relationships – two men, two women. for “Fort Blossom Revised.” A New York Times review said “Dance, the body, and erotics are topics about which ‘Fort Blossom Revisited’ keeps testing, investigating and analyzing, and often brilliantly. Leaving the theater we are no longer quite what we were when we arrived.” This is the ideal of every artist who strives to go beyond “art for art’s sake. Whether we have spent a few moments contemplating an O’Keefe painting or a half hour listening to a Beethoven symphony, “we are no longer quite what we were” when we started.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: