I’ve written several times about the performance duo, Wild Torus: constantly traveling performance artists who have worked with other artists to further audience involvement in performance. In July, I was fortunate to get them to come to a video session in the Ridgewood section Queens. You can get a sense of what happened from the video below.

As you watch it, I suggest you think about three questions:

  • What do you get from watching?
  • What do you think the performers got from the session?
  • Would some type of performance art be valid self expression for you?

I’ll be holding another video session on the afternoon of Saturday, September 23 (2:30 to 5:30 p.m.). This session won’t involve smearing paint on our bodies. It will be an exploration of power, it’s effect on the person who has the power and on the people who give him power.

This session will be guided by a scenario called “The King Needs More Clothes.” In it, a generous king gives his clothes to his subjects; but when he has given everything, his courtiers demand more clothes until the king is overburdened with everyone else’s clothes. Our scenario is a starting point for improvisation. Every performer’s ideas contribute to the final shoot.

Doors will open at 2:10 P.M.

You are welcome at this event if you are at least eighteen years of age, are willing to be photographed with full nudity, and are willing to have this video be available for non-commercial display. You may bring guests if they also meet these qualifications.

Donations to help cover the cost of this event will be accepted, but not required.

Do you want to be part of the September 23 Video Shoot?

If so, please use Facebook to let us know you’re coming, or send a text message with your email address to 518-321-1356. I’ll send you the exact location of the session.

In my May 30th post, “Being Wild with Wild Torus,” I wrote “I see in Wild Torus performers taking risks, inviting each other to take risks and inviting the audience to take risks. Do these risks help us know who we are? Do they help us be more truly what we are meant to be? Only by taking the risks can I find out.” In two days, I’ll be furthering my exploration with a second visit to the Torus Portal.

This time, I’m contributing a video to the evening. I noticed that between the live acts there were sections where performers were setting up and visual stimulus for the audience came from video projection. I’ve created about twenty-four minutes of video that will be used in this way. and here’s a short segment from it.

The event starts at 6:00 PM. this coming Saturday (July 2) at a basement space called “The Torus Porta,” 113 Stockholm Street (off Myrtle Ave.) in the Bushwick Section of Brooklyn. It has been billed as “The Closing of the Torus Porta” – the final event to be held at 113 Stockholm. The list of performers is long, with the last performances starting at 3:00 AM.

If you’ve been following my blog, you know that I have a Vimeo channel called Erotic Imagination, where I focus on videos that use nudity in staged and filmed performances. As I view them, I try to see what artistic truth is being presented or reinforced by the naked performers.

In 2012, a video by Dimitris Papaioannou, led me to discover that he was performing in Troy, New York. My reaction to his work is recorded on a blog post, “Acting as One

A week ago Saturday, was only the second time, that I’ve attended an event after seeing videos on Vimeo – this time after seeing “Morte Portus Vitae”

and “Bushwick Coal Mind,” –

two productions of a group called “Wild Torus.”

When I searched for “Wild Torus” on the internet, I found comments like these:

“All I could see were a number of sweaty, naked bodies covered in stickiness and powder.”

“I couldn’t distinguish between men, women, and blow-up dolls.”

“Let me tell you, “wild” in @wildtorus is a serious understatement. These guys are bat-sh*t crazy,.”

“I decided if I stayed one more moment I risked tumbling head-first into a DMT-fueled trip back to whatever the hell regrettable things I was doing at festivals as a teenager. And I wasn’t about to strip, which made things slightly awkward– clothing wasn’t optional here, it was seriously frowned upon.”

On the evening I attended, all of the spectators except two kept all their clothes on. One female performer was naked at the end, but no man’s cock was ever visible.

The event consisted of a number of acts crammed into a small space with only a few chairs – most of the audience standing or sitting on the floor. Wild Torus was scheduled for the last act of the evening. This evening, it wasn’t their act that took the prize for being “bat-sh*t crazy.” That came earlier, when bare-breasted Phoebe Novak, carrying a violin and two violas, stepped on a large pice of black plastic that had been put down to serve as her stage. From a box, she produced a number of pieces of broken mirror. She then got spectators to tape these broken shards to her bare skin.

Woman having fragments of mirror taped to her bare skin.

As she bowed her violin, and later the violas in turn, one of the pieces of broken mirror poked into her bare breast. I found myself wondering if the pain in the music was a direct result of this painful act of bowing or if she was using this pain to stimulate emotional pain of previous experiences. Suddenly, she called an end to her performance, gather her stringed instruments from audience members who had been plucking them, and moved into the adjoining back room of Torus Porta. There were a few drops of blood on the floor.

Most of the acts focused more on sonic phenomenon rather than visual, until the final piece – the work of Wild Torus itself. This started with the performance artist Rudi Salpietra singing with Marc Mosteirin accompanying him on a Korg keyboard. When I asked Marc afterwards if they had rehearsed, he said that it was entirely improvised, but that he had a close relationship with Rudi that helped make the song work. After the song, translucent plastic was rolled down on two sides of the performance space. This made it difficult to see the performers covering each other with poster paint.

Woman with paint, audience behind plastic

I moved out from behind the plastic to see better and later stripped to my briefs to let my body be covered with paint.

What is there to say about all of this? It’s hard to know. What I can say is that I see in Wild Torus performers taking risks, inviting each other to take risks and inviting the audience to take risks. Do these risks help us know who we are? Do they help us be more truly what we are meant to be? Only by taking the risks can I find out.

In the end, we were left to clean ourselves up as best we could. If I had designed the ritual I would have added a section where the performers and those audience members who were covered with paint clean each other up.

The performers of Wild Torus are now in Europe. When they return, I hope to further my exploration of their brand of wildness and to report on that exploration in this blog.

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